Retro CPC Dongle – Part 28

As promised in Part 27, I’ve finished a new build of the CPC2 hardware. Here are the board layouts as rendered by OshPark , and if you’re interested, I’ve shared the project.

Top Side
Bottom Side
Four-layer Board

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 23

I unboxed the Terasic DE10-Nano! What a great bit of kit for a bargain price of $130! Nice going Terasic – you build some amazing stuff. I couldn’t buy the components for that price! Here it is, plugged into my development box.

DE10-Nano (Click for Large)

The cables are (anti-clockwise from 11), 5V/2A power from the power brick, USB Blaster connection, Ethernet plugged direct into my dev box (no crossover or switch), FTDI UART console.

There are two images available from the Terasic site, an Ubuntu image with full LXDE GUI, or a console image. I started with the Ubuntu image, just because it had a great ControlPanel App to show linkage to the DE10.

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 22

The screen shot below says it all. Yay! Video output from the CPC2.0!

Colour test for HDMI output from CPC2.0 board

I promised myself that I wouldn’t post those shaky photos/videos that people seem to post of their game/emulator/screen. Unfortunately, at this time a photo of the screen is the best I can do. Longer term, I’ll get a HDMI capture card from eBay and capture the screens properly, but for now this will have to do as proof of success! Colour bars. Continue reading

Retro CPC Dongle – Part 21

Developing a complex embedded system like the CPC2.0 from scratch is a series of massive achievements in miniature, like a nano-scale thunderstorm. Huge steps forward are represented by a signal line going high, or a chip outputting a short sequence of bits, proving the framework of everything built to date. This project is just like that, so it’s tough to explain to people that those few numbers on the screen represent thousands of hours of coding in C, RTL and hardware design to get a coded sequence out of the HDMI chip. There can be a lot of effort behind a blinky LED.

So, to make it a more interesting post, I thought I’d start with this:

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