Retro CPC Dongle – Part 43

With the world in lockdown, you’d think there’s plenty of time for hobbies. Somehow, it’s been 4 months since my last post – time flies in a crisis! I’ll admit that I’ve been somewhat lax in working on the CPC2, but with the project so close to completion, I need to re-commit to finishing this 5-year project! Today’s post is about my CPC Bluetooth joystick!

Modded Atari 2600 joystick

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 42

Christmas holidays are over and with it, my loooong days testing the CPC2.3 board are also over. So before I go back to work, here’s the current state of the CPC2. Spoiler: It’s GREAT!

The application used for testing is copyright Firebird and Telecomsoft.

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 41

Build v2.3

So the next build of the CPC2 is done. I recorded the process with a time-lapse camera because it’s hard to make a 7 hour build entertaining. Each second of video is 30 seconds of assembly time, so this 7-hour build ended up at 7m19s of timelapse, after cutting out the cursing and head-scratching. See if you can spot my hands start to shake at the 2-hour mark of trying to precisely place the sub-millimetre components and enjoy.

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 40

Doesn’t time fly? It’s been 6 months since my last post! My only excuse is that I started a new job and learning a new culture and processes is pretty exhausting. I have tended to work on this project during the evening, but kids being what they are, rarely co-operate when you need some project time. Time to work on the CPC2 has been limited indeed.

There’s been a fair bit of activity though, so let’s take you though what has been done.

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Retro CPC Dongle – Part 38

This post talks about HyperRAM, what it is, how to interface to it and how to improve the performance of high-speed parallel interfaces.

HyperRAM is described well by Cypress. It is essentially a double data rate RAM with a compact 12-line interface that masks the underlying technology of a DDR SDRAM.  It can provide 333MB/s of data transfer in short bursts. Data is transferred on both edges of the clock, and the narrow bus makes it ideal for microprocessors or pin-constrained FPGAs. Continue reading